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Thread: Happy Halloween!!!

  1. #51
    Too Daze Gone baddfingerz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BondJmsBond View Post
    No knocks on door last night, good thing 'cause all I had was a single bag of skittles. Would have had to give each kid 1 skittle..


    I don't get any knocks here, even in an apt. complex. I think the kiddies & their parents just look out for the decorated places.




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  3. #52
    It's the Code Word... Frosty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by baddfingerz View Post
    I don't get any knocks here, even in an apt. complex. I think the kiddies & their parents just look out for the decorated places.
    We put a crappy laminated paper pumpkin that we paid $1 for 5 years ago up in the window and a plastic pumpkin with a light in it on the porch
    and I think we got about a dozen kids so they got a generous handful of candy each.
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  5. #53
    jumping on eggshells sp88's Avatar
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    in the uk, it's kind of an unwritten rule not to trick-and-treat a house that doesn't have some decorations or pumpkins about - still got 3 of the little shits knocking on my door tho

    they were greeted with a hearty "we haven't got anything to give you - now bugger off because united (manchester) are on the telly and you're making me miss it"

    "i know enough to know what's instantly forgettable"

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  7. #54
    Super Moderator Toto's Avatar
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    Not necessary buying more Candy as normal here.
    The Teens made a Zombie Walk in the City and a few clubs had Halloween partys.
    But i haven't seen any kids begging for sweets.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

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  9. #55
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    I had to work all day and night.
    I dressed up There were enough Trick Or Treaters to empty a pumpklin and a cauldron of candy

    God I Love Halloween




    To Each Their Own

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  11. #56

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    Quote Originally Posted by defrabbit View Post
    wouldn't have thought that Evel Knievel was still relevant for today's
    kids, though I guess the jumpsuits are classic americana.
    the evil knievel costume was handmade by an aunt decades ago, i saved it from being thrown away. the neighborhood we wuz in really went all out for halloween. whole streets of decorated houses, strobe lights, scary music, etc. little goblins were everywhere. as an overgrown kid myself i rate halloween right up there with christmas. i believe we can thank our scots-irish immigrants for the halloween traditions as we know 'em.

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  13. #57
    Too Daze Gone baddfingerz's Avatar
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    You guys know of the true origins of the holiday?




    Crying parents tell their children
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    A son exclaims there'll be nothing to do to
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  15. #58
    High Priestess of The Classics Jenny's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by baddfingerz View Post
    You guys know of the true origins of the holiday?

    I was raised Catholic......'nuff said.

    sig courtesy of B.Bubba

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  17. #59
    Too Daze Gone baddfingerz's Avatar
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    Crying parents tell their children
    If you survive don't do as we did
    A son exclaims there'll be nothing to do to
    Her daughter says she'll be dead with you...



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  19. #60
    Too Daze Gone baddfingerz's Avatar
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    From the wiki:

    Samhain
    (pronounced /ˈsɑːwɪn/ SAH-win or /ˈsaʊ.ɪn/ SOW-in) was the first and most important of the four quarter days in the medieval Gaelic calendar and was celebrated on 31 October – 1 November in Ireland, Scotland and the Isle of Man.[38][39] A kindred festival was held at the same time of year by the Brittonic Celts, called Calan Gaeaf in Wales, Kalan Gwav in Cornwall and Kalan Goañv in Brittany; a name meaning "first day of winter". For the Celts, the day ended and began at sunset; thus the festival began on the evening before 1 November by modern reckoning.[40] Samhain and Calan Gaeaf are mentioned in some of the earliest Irish and Welsh literature. The names have been used by historians to refer to Celtic Halloween customs up until the 19th century,[41] and are still the Gaelic and Welsh names for Halloween.

    Samhain/Calan Gaeaf marked the end of the harvest season and beginning of winter or the 'darker half' of the year.[42][43] Like Beltane/Calan Mai, it was seen as a liminal time, when the boundary between this world and the Otherworld thinned. This meant the Aos Sí (pronounced /iːˈʃiː/ ees-SHEE), the 'spirits' or 'fairies', could more easily come into our world and were particularly active.[44][45] Most scholars see the Aos Sí as "degraded versions of ancient gods [...] whose power remained active in the people's minds even after they had been officially replaced by later religious beliefs". The Aos Sí were both respected and feared, with individuals often invoking the protection of God when approaching their dwellings.[46][47] At Samhain, it was believed that the Aos Sí needed to be propitiated to ensure that the people and their livestock survived the winter. Offerings of food and drink, or portions of the crops, were left outside for the Aos Sí.[48][49][50] The souls of the dead were also said to revisit their homes seeking hospitality.[51] Places were set at the dinner table and by the fire to welcome them.[52] The belief that the souls of the dead return home on one night of the year and must be appeased seems to have ancient origins and is found in many cultures throughout the world.[53] In 19th century Ireland, "candles would be lit and prayers formally offered for the souls of the dead. After this the eating, drinking, and games would begin".[54]

    Throughout Ireland and Britain, the household festivities included rituals and games intended to foretell one's future, especially regarding death and marriage.[55] Apples and nuts were often used in these divination rituals. They included apple bobbing, nut roasting, scrying or mirror-gazing, pouring molten lead or egg whites into water, dream interpretation, and others.[56] Special bonfires were lit and there were rituals involving them. Their flames, smoke and ashes were deemed to have protective and cleansing powers, and were also used for divination.[41][42] In some places, torches lit from the bonfire were carried sunwise around homes and fields to protect them.[41] It is suggested that the fires were a kind of imitative or sympathetic magic – they mimicked the Sun, helping the "powers of growth" and holding back the decay and darkness of winter.[52][57][58] In Scotland, these bonfires and divination games were banned by the church elders in some parishes.[59] In Wales, bonfires were lit to "prevent the souls of the dead from falling to earth".[60] Later, these bonfires served to keep "away the devil"...



    These are the pagan origins of Halloween; a lot of traditional Christians would be shocked to know of how steeped the holiday is (historically) in their own religion.




    Crying parents tell their children
    If you survive don't do as we did
    A son exclaims there'll be nothing to do to
    Her daughter says she'll be dead with you...



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