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  1. #51
    jumping on eggshells sp88's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Arbiec View Post
    I have a feeling the one you are looking for is the most convoluted that includes a sacrifice of a newly promoted major piece?
    i ain't sayin' nuthin'



    when you see how this one plays out, it really is a thing of beauty
    "i know enough to know what's instantly forgettable"

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  3. #52
    jumping on eggshells sp88's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sp88 View Post
    let's finish this one out because i hate these things hanging around too long - if you have a board, i'd advise setting it up so you can see how the sequence develops

    -

    white's 1st move has to be the knight's check on f6 and, as previously discussed, the only move black can sensibly make is king to g7 - remember, black's king must avoid the f7 square at all costs so it's knight can go there should white's pawn promote on d8 - if white queens unchallenged, the game is lost

    white continues with the checking strategy and moves the knight to h5 - black's king cannot move to either the 8th rank or f7 or white will queen with no chance of immediate recapture - it also can't return to h7 or a bishop check will lead to either mate within 2 or forcing the king to occupy the f7 square - so black's king has to move to g6

    white now moves the bishop to c2 - again, black's king must avoid f7 - only move is black king takes knight on h5

    next move is the killer - white now promotes to queen on d8 - black must move it's knight to f7 - any other move is as good as admitting defeat

    white's king moves to e6 and black's knight takes the queen on d8, checking the white king

    white's king moves to safety on f5, where there is no danger of being immediately checked - this is the vital position - black's king is now trapped on the h5 square, being unable to move to the g file (white's king on f5 blocks), h6 (black's own pawn blocks) or h4 (white's pawn blocks) - black's king now sits on a light square and white has a light square bishop on c2 to play with - checkmate looms large

    the only move black has to avoid mate in 2 is pawn to e2 - white's bishop replies by moving to e4, now threatening mate on f3

    black's only reply is to promote the pawn on e1 to a knight, protecting the f3 square (anything else is an instant win for white) - white replies with bishop to d5, with a view to mate via c4 and e2

    the only possible defence against this line involves black moving it's pawn immediately to c2 - white's bishop goes to c4 - black moves the pawn to c1 and promotes to another knight, now protecting e2 (again, any other promotion leads to mate for white)

    white's bishop now moves to b5, with the threat of mate on e8 - the only logical reply to try and stop this is black's knight from a6 to c7, covering the e8 square

    white's bishop now goes to a4, threatening mate on d1

    -

    if you've set a board up to follow this sequence, you should now be seeing that black has no moves that will help now - white's bishop will land on d1, delivering mate - the only prolonging moves black has is to block the way with it's knights but that doesn't stop the inevitable

    as i said, tal was the only grandmaster who managed to beat this puzzle at the tournament it was showcased at, which is perhaps unsurprising - tal, of all the famous chess players going, had the reputation of throwing in mad moves that nobody else would probably even think of

    Last edited by sp88; 04-17-2020 at 01:57 AM.
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  5. #53
    jumping on eggshells sp88's Avatar
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    try this puzzle on for size …..

    thanos to play and win



    "i know enough to know what's instantly forgettable"

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  7. #54
    ಠ_ಠ defrabbit's Avatar
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    what with all the coloured balls, I peg him more as a Chinese Checkers type guy.

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  9. #55
    jumping on eggshells sp88's Avatar
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    2 grandmasters are playing chess - they have played 3 games - each player has 2 wins

    how is this possible?

    Last edited by sp88; 04-28-2020 at 05:28 AM.
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  11. #56

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    Quote Originally Posted by sp88 View Post
    2 grandmasters are playing chess - they have played 3 games - each player has 2 wins

    how is this possible?

    Four players in a round robin tournament, two of which are the Grandmasters mentioned plus two others?

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  13. #57
    jumping on eggshells sp88's Avatar
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    ^

    yep, a nice easy one - they're both playing other people

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  15. #58
    jumping on eggshells sp88's Avatar
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    abhimanyu mishra became the youngest ever chess grandmaster recently at 12 years, 4 months and 25 days old - he beat the previous record of 12 years, 7 months, which was set back in 2002

    naturally, you would think that anyone that becomes a chess grandmaster, at whatever age, is a gifted player, but does that necessarily follow?

    nigel short, the vice president of fide, has been quoted as saying "i believe it is possible that, if i went to the effort, i think i could get my dog a grandmaster's title"

    this is because professional chess is riddled with match fixing, arranging the outcomes of chess matches so that players can pick up valuable points (or even half points) to chase ranking titles

    when the previous record was set in 2002, it only occurred after young sergey karjakin had only managed a draw in a match he needed to win - his chances of claiming the title of youngest grandmaster had slipped away - until, that is, his father approached several of the opponents he had already met and asked to have their match replayed as a pre-arranged draw for a financial settlement - one opponent duly obliged and effectively threw the match, having already accumulated enough points himself from the tournament - it was claimed this was done for free however and therefore the helpful opponent did not consider it cheating

    there are no rules against doing this, and no proper guidelines prohibiting financial arrangements between parties either

    but there have also been claims, lower down the chess ladder, that some matches have never even taken place with the results just pre-decided and submitted without two people ever facing each other across a chessboard

    as for mishra, i saw an interview with him a few weeks back - he was asked what he liked to do when he wasn't playing chess - his reply was that he was always playing chess and didn't have time for just being a kid - he also said he didn't have friends

    mishra's father has stated he has spent more that $250,000 on trying to secure the youngest grandmaster title for his son, via online donations and fundraising - becoming a grandmaster can open up all sorts of doors for lucrative offers, so it's an investment

    but mishra's recent success is also threatening to be the straw that breaks the camel's back - some top players have begun to come forward and publicly call for the rules on qualifying to be rethought - especially in the light of a lack of clarity about match fixing

    in the middle of the 20th century, a grandmaster was quite a special thing - everybody knew your name (spassky, fischer, kasparov, et al) and they were seen as the absolute elite of chess, perhaps only numbering around 30 at the top of their game in any given moment - then, fide changed the qualifying rules to try and promote chess around the world - being a grandmaster was suddenly a little less special and players began to look for new challenges, such as being the youngest - today, there are around 2,000 grandmasters - some ex-players estimate that perhaps some 10 percent of those achieved their titles partially through arranged matches

    mishra seems like a nice kid - he's polite and clearly loves chess - i find it a little sad that his family is pushing him so hard at the expense of his childhood but that's their call - it must be hard that some sections of the chess community are calling his achievement out as being dodgy, but what else can you say about it?

    chess has always avoided controversy by virtue of being a niche sport and flying under the radar but the advent of online chess and tv shows like "the queen's gambit" is helping it become more prominent - that brings extra scrutiny too

    even if a rethink is around the corner, can you ever go backwards?
    Last edited by sp88; 07-25-2021 at 07:03 AM.
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  17. #59
    ಠ_ಠ defrabbit's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sp88 View Post
    this is because professional chess is riddled with match fixing...


    roll the trailer for a noir crime thriller where the protagonist
    is a chess player on the run from the mob after failing to take
    a dive during a chess match.

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  19. #60
    jumping on eggshells sp88's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by defrabbit View Post
    a chess player on the run from the mob after failing to take
    a dive during a chess match.
    the nailbiting chase scene finale naturally finds our hero trying to outrun the bad guys 2 steps forward then 1 step to the side
    "i know enough to know what's instantly forgettable"

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